Milan Hendrickx

Milan Hendrickx

°1995
St Lucas School of Arts Antwerp
milan.hendrickx@gmail.com

“Where is Mister Invisible?“ – This short question provides an introduction to the works of Milan Hendrickx. Like the Creator, the exact meaning of the works is hard to grasp, almost invisible. Milan has dedicated himself to art of painting. Therefore, he studies in this major at the Sint-Lucas School of Art in Antwerp for two years now. He paints his works on larger than life size canvas and uses different materials like spray paint or fabrics of clothing which give the painting various surface structure. His intimate and emotional memory function as his motives which he shows figuratively in merging with room compositions. Mostly, he begins with a photograph or a picture from his memory. You can see people from his private life. The viewer gets an insight into his thoughts but will never be able to fully understand them. This creates an exciting and magical atmosphere in which the viewer is drawn to. In his works, Milan combines elements like the link to his memories, a reduced choice of colours and room compositions. To this end, he first studies different colour constellations or room elements, especially the function of doors. Also, he designs his works instinctively and intuitively. Only after the completion of his work, do connections become apparent which he was not aware while his work process.
For the exhibition Milan combines his paintings with objects for the first time. The objects are an example of instinctive constellation during his work process. They can be retrofitted to the works without any pre-planning. Additionally, the works receive a deeper meaning and are going in a sculptural direction. They go beyond the limit of a two-dimensional plane. The viewer is not only captivated by the depth of his painting, but the painting becomes part of the viewer’s dimension. The individuality of the painting and the viewer interact with each other and breaks any boundaries which normal paintings would have.

© Ilka Hüsges

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